Man to Look After You V Follow Your Heart

October 6, 2011 § 48 Comments

My friends divide into those who say I must go with Poppy Seed, a man (who potentially might) look after me, and those of a more romantic bent who say, follow your heart and seek out (probably unreliable in possibly almost every sense) Long Shot.

There is no predicting which type of friends fall into which category.  I have found that I have been surprised by how seemingly sensible ones say follow your heart, and seemingly romantic ones tell me I have to be cynical at this point and go for the “sensible” ie. moneyed option.

I am shocked.  I have always had church mice boyfriends and never in my life had a rich one.  I lie.  I once had a fling with an older, rich man who took me to a shop and bought me £400 worth of clothes.  First and last time and completely extraordinary.  I did not feel comfortable although, I own, I did accept them.  It felt thrilling but odd and I felt guilty, so much so that I have never forgotten it.  It never happened again.  My mother always told me that if a man ever took me out to dinner I should order the very cheapest thing on the menu (fuck, I pined for the scallops but instead ate more melon and parma ham than anyone should reasonably have to), and always at least offer to pay my share even if I capitulated when he insisted on taking care of the whole bill himself.  Never was I to go on holiday with a man who paid for me.  Why not, I asked her?  Because then you would be under a certain obligation.  What if he was really, really in love with me and wanted me to go with him and I couldn’t because I did not have the means myself?  Too bad.  I was never to do it.  I never did.  The invitation – and dilemma – never arose.  I was never an expensive girl.  I didn’t give off that vibe and so didn’t engender that kind of treatment.

Regardless of the Poppy Seed V Long Shot scenario – well, perhaps not entirely regardless – I know in which camp I remain.  I have never been looked after, so looking after myself comes naturally; no choice.  It is a lovely idea, this looking after, but I expect it comes at a price, and if that price is that you don’t fancy him, that is surely too high a price, but a price which many a cleverer woman than me has been prepared to pay.  I am a follow your heart type, though that means it’s been broken a few times.  I console myself with the fact that at least I have experienced emotions that are Shakespearean; at least I have lived.

I think about Poppy Seed.  If he were the age he is and broke, would I be going on a second date with him?  I damn well hope so, is all I can say.  I should like to stick with my picture of myself as no gold-digger so am putting down my going along to the next date to liking him, to keeping an open mind, as well as to the persuasiveness of my friends in the Man to Look After You For Once camp.  The evidence of my history is that I really am not a gold-digger.  The evidence of the fact that LS is doing it for me in my head more than PS, but LS hasn’t been in touch. And I would be an arsehole to write off a kind and companionable – and let’s face it, interested – man like PS before having given him a second chance…?

I hope that is the case, I sincerely do.  Or else all the cynical men who so frequently comment on this site that all women are ever after is money, will have their money’s worth shouting me down and telling me there is no such thing as a woman who isn’t a gold-digger.

Well, fuck them.  There are plenty of us in fact.  And I am on a mission to prove those men wrong.

PS. Today is a quite a day for me in many respects.  A work revelation is due.  A date is fixed.  And the watertight pretext for contacting LS might be forthcoming.  If I don’t Approve Comments quite as swiftly as usual, I apologise, it’s because I am in and out, away from my desk more than usual.  But I haven’t abandoned ship, I promise.  [Jesus, I am loving keeping this blog going but it is every bit as demanding as having a cat or dog!  I may have to neglect it for a few hours here and there, but there again, at least I don’t have to take you lot on a fucking walk!]

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§ 48 Responses to Man to Look After You V Follow Your Heart

  • Sarah says:

    Gold-diggers are people who base their decision about who to date/marry solely on how much money their potential partner has. Men or women.

    Of course the financial consideration comes into it – no one wants to pick up the tab for a hopeless loser layabout, but with most people, other things count too. Like intelligence, a sense of humour, general compatibility etc.

    A lot of men seem to be fixated on gold-digging women and I suppose it’s because they may have met some/many, but not all women are like that. I’ve encountered a number of men who were after a free ride because their finances were low and they thought any woman would be glad to look after them. One turned up at the door of a friend’s house for a first weekend visit with his entire worldly goods in two enormous suitcases plus a goldfish. He fully intended never to depart. She kicked him out after 4 days.

    Plankton, you don’t have to justify yourself to us you know. You know you are not a gold-digger and you know what you want. LS smells like trouble but until you get him out of your system you’ll never put him to rest.

  • plumgrape says:

    I must confess that I am glad that this is making you think. Things are not always as they appear.I think you must spin until your heart is content. How soon do you want to settle down? Look at the picture of Patti and Keith Richards soon after they met, in his book “Life”. If a partner like either of them isn’t worth totally cherishing whatever the circumstances surrounding them then nothing in this world is! I’m sorry I can’t find the picture to show you exactly.

  • MissM says:

    It is not the gold digging woman alone I look askance at, but also the man who is willing to pay for a woman as though she is a commodity. The women who allow themselves to be purchased are essentially prostitutes with a client base of one, but they wouldn’t exist if there were no men doing the soliciting. The classic extreme case was Anna Nicole Smith and J Howard Marshall. Clearly she didn’t love him but then neither did he love her, if she was 62 years older he’d have had zero interest in her. They used each other. I suspect in the end Smith was the less happy of the two.

    To each their own, but I would rather pay my own way even if it does mean I have less in the way of material things, and hope to be loved for who I am by someone I have genuine feelings for. So I really don’t care about a man’s financial position. It is my opinion that the person who is truly loved is the richest person in the world anyway.

    • kidrock says:

      What you say and what you do are 2 different things.
      Sorry to have to burst your bubble, but 90% of the girls i meet claim the same thing, which is fine but then their actions speak otherwise.

      Call me a cynic, but I find it hard to believe that any woman who found herself in the same position as Anna Nicole would have done things differently.

  • H says:

    Hi Plankton, I applaud you! No, we are not all gold diggers. I’m just like you – a girl with inexpenive tastes, who’s never had rich boyfriends, whose husband is poor, church mouse, who’s never had someone pay for her holiday or wardrobe and who, like you, had a tendency to chose the cheapest things on the menu (how that made me laugh, are you sure we weren’t seperated at birth?!). I’ve always looked after myself and, even now I’m married, kind of still do. It’s a habit. But, you know, the heart is the way to go. My sister’s had all those rich, look-after-you type suitors, loads of fancy trips and sackfuls of clothes/handbags/jewellery as gifts. It hasn’t made her happy. Far from it. You have to be true to your heart and fall in love for the right reasons – money, although it’s nice to have it of course, shouldn’t make a big difference. I love your blog and you are a great writer.

  • Amanda says:

    I once went out with a wealthy guy and realised quite quickly that he didn’t set my heart alight. After a few dates I told my friends that I was thinking of stopping seeing him but they put forward all the financial incentives – posh dinners, posh frocks, huge house, big parties and so on. So I decided to give it another go, he was a really nice guy, good looking so what was there to lose? I tell you what I lost – my spirit. I ended it within only a few weeks as I was spending my valuable time smiling when I felt sad, laughing when I was bored and cringing if ever bed was mentioned (we didn’t). These women that marry for money, I really don’t know how they do it. The guy that I loved (and lost) was forever in blue jeans and broke – but he was never boring and very very sexy.

    • kidrock says:

      So what happened to ‘blue jeans’ then?

      • Amanda says:

        Well we married and then he left. I can say I lived the dream for a while, but not long. He left me after only a few months. I have vague connections to him but I haven’t the composure to even begin to ask how he is (10 years later! – how sad I am). I know he loves women so he’ll be happy somewhere, just not with me. I actually hadn’t thought of him for a while, it was just this talk of marrying for money that bought it all back. Maybe I would have been happier long term with a few extra noughts on my bank balance!

      • kidrock says:

        how long had you known him before the 2 of you got married and what was the reason he gave for leaving you?

      • Amanda says:

        We met when i was at high school and went out twice, then we met 10 years later just by chance. We were together about 2 years before getting married. We got married in June and he could hardly talk to me by December, I’m still not sure quite what happened. His reasons were that I didn’t keep the house right (?!) but I think he simply fell out of love with me and the idea of being a married man. By the way, he finished with me every time we dated so who’s the muppet! Love eh? Who’d have it.

      • kidrock says:

        I have to question why you got married to him in the first place. I mean if the two of you had a good thing going (which i assume you did) then was it absolutely necesary to get married – whose idea was it?

        Do you think the conclusion for the relationship would have been the same if you didnt get married and continued as you were?

      • Amanda says:

        Hi – I’m not even sure I’m replying correctly here, I read your email and then lost it, sorry. Blue Jeans asked me, twice. I should have trusted me instinct that I somehow had the first time he asked. The second time he proposed was at a wedding and you know what damage a romantic day like that can do to your common sense.

        I think it would have ended that same though. It was the mundane, but necessary, stuff that comes with sharing a house that got us in the end. Have you got a story kidrock?

      • kidrock says:

        I really have no room to comment on this whole marriage malarky since I have never experienced it myself. I suspect like with anything, it has the tendency to get boring/monotonous unless you constantly work at maintaining it. For too many people out there, marriage = complacency and this is something I disagree with.

        Mine is a happy story so far – single, never been married and enjoying life at the moment without any complications. I will probably get married somewhere down the line but that is only because I want children. Since 90% of the people in my current social group are married, I feel at times, under pressure to retain the status quo but that doesn’t really bother me too much. The social circle just needs widening I guess.

        I currently date women outside of the 30-40 age group since IMO, 30-something girls are total nutjobs. Life is good.

      • Amanda says:

        I’ve only just realised your a man, this blog chat must sometimes make you thankful for it.

        I agree with your thoughts on keeping a marriage alive. I’m married again now and you can feel the complacency occasionally creep in. Luckliy I am older and wiser and love him very much, so I give myself a kick and add a few sparks. My husband also does the same, whether consciously I don’t know.

        All I know is that being in love is brilliant. If I’m not in love I’d rather spend my times with old friends or just having new experiences. Life’s too short too faff about setling down to please others.

        I hope your life continues to be a good one. May your women be sane and your friends plentiful.

        But have you not been so overwhelmed by love that you would give it all up for just one more kiss?

        Probably best to ignore me, I’m an old battered romantic.

        In the grand scheme of things we are two people who can say life is good. That must be worth something.

      • DAN says:

        AMANDA,
        GOOD ON YOU GIRL !

        Keep that love rolling !

        DAN.

      • kidrock says:

        Married again? Interesting. How soon was it before you decided to hop back on the matrimonial horse? I guess the notion of once bitten twice shy, must fall outside the precincts of your life. Either that or you’re just an adventurous gal. Take your pick. Lol. Anyhow I wish you well in your endeavours. Do you have any children? I know getting married again is normally a challenge especially when there are kids involved.

        My belief is that we can almost always choose who we fall in and out of love with – comparable to most things in life, it’s merely a question of choice. Call me a cynic, but I don’t buy into the idea that the urge is uncontrollable. The dreamy romance fantasy/ideology is just something we construct to rationalise the scenario. ‘Fantasy love is much better than Reality Love’ (Andy Warhol). I generally agree with what the social exchange theory concludes – weighing things up in terms of the associated cost/benefit.

        Now, some may suggest this is an inhumane way to view things but maybe it’s because I have never experienced truly being in love since we often shape ourselves based on our experiences.

      • Amanda says:

        Hi Dan

        I think we are the yin and yang of people. Have you never been in love? You talk about the cost/benefit ratio like someone looking at my accounts instead of a human being.

        I am too ‘polyanna’, my mum use to keep joking about me swooning and mooning in June, or something similar. I know that life often shocks me as I expect everyone to love birds flying or cloud structures, and they judge me. Normally tell me to go and light a joss stick and meditate!!

        All I know is the twice I’ve loved have been stomach churning, knee wobbling occasions – I’m now thinking this is because I’m a woman. Yet I still maintain that you cannot consciously produce these feelings, although I am enough of a realist to know it is an internal chemical reaction. And it is not lust, I’ve felt both (thank goodness!) and they’re not the same.

        It took many years, a complete change of jobs, a tour of the world and a complete move of country before I felt ready again. And this was more of a slow burn love, less frantic, and yes, we have 2 children.

        You mentioned in a previous email about getting married to have children. Well I could write a small book on the subject, but in a nutshell, make sure the one you’re with is right. Kids are lovely, I’d lay my life down for them, but I hope we would have had just as great a time without them, and they’ll be gone before you know it and you’re back to just the two of you. I’m going on I know, I’m a woman, it’s Friday afternoon and I’m surrounded by paperwork – I’d rather chat.

        I think you must be younger than me – I’m 43 in a few weeks.

        By the way, I don’t think that you are at all inhumane. If or when you make your choice of I’m sure you will have made a great decision, and maybe stand a far greater chance of succeeding as you’re not acting on a fantasy. Maybe I’ve proven that by marrying bue jeans – love was of no help to me then. What good is a churning stomach when you’re signing divorce papers?

        After reading The Plankton’s blog and seeing all the replies you must also have a keen insight into us women – it’s a wonder you’ve not run a mile!

        Anyway, it’s the start of the weekend now. I hope you have a good one and I’m also hoping that love gives you a big bite on the bum!

        Amanda x

      • DAN says:

        Hi Amanda, i think you may have meant this message for Kidrock not me ?

        DAN.

      • Amanda says:

        Hi Dan

        Sorry! You don’t need to be troubled by my ramblings….

        My mum also used to say that I was very intelligent, but to the detriment of my common sense and practical side. Obviously there is a limit to the brain’s different aspects.

        But thank you for your upbeat comments – you could be a motivational speaker.

        I will repeat my message to kidrock so forgive me if you see it twice – I’m not to technically minded (no room left!).

        Enjoy the rest of your weekend

        Amanda x

      • Amanda says:

        (Kidrock – sorry this was for you. I’m thinking I should have concentrated on my paperwork on Friday afternoon. If you’ve seen this twice, apologies. I’m now off to confuse someone else x)

        Original message from Friday –

        I think we are the yin and yang of people. Have you never been in love? You talk about the cost/benefit ratio like someone looking at my accounts instead of a human being.

        I am too ‘polyanna’, my mum use to keep joking about me swooning and mooning in June, or something similar. I know that life often shocks me as I expect everyone to love birds flying or cloud structures, and they judge me. Normally tell me to go and light a joss stick and meditate!!

        All I know is the twice I’ve loved have been stomach churning, knee wobbling occasions – I’m now thinking this is because I’m a woman. Yet I still maintain that you cannot consciously produce these feelings, although I am enough of a realist to know it is an internal chemical reaction. And it is not lust, I’ve felt both (thank goodness!) and they’re not the same.

        It took many years, a complete change of jobs, a tour of the world and a complete move of country before I felt ready again. And this was more of a slow burn love, less frantic, and yes, we have 2 children.

        You mentioned in a previous email about getting married to have children. Well I could write a small book on the subject, but in a nutshell, make sure the one you’re with is right. Kids are lovely, I’d lay my life down for them, but I hope we would have had just as great a time without them, and they’ll be gone before you know it and you’re back to just the two of you. I’m going on I know, I’m a woman, it’s Friday afternoon and I’m surrounded by paperwork – I’d rather chat.

        I think you must be younger than me – I’m 43 in a few weeks.

        By the way, I don’t think that you are at all inhumane. If or when you make your choice of I’m sure you will have made a great decision, and maybe stand a far greater chance of succeeding as you’re not acting on a fantasy. Maybe I’ve proven that by marrying bue jeans – love was of no help to me then. What good is a churning stomach when you’re signing divorce papers?

        After reading The Plankton’s blog and seeing all the replies you must also have a keen insight into us women – it’s a wonder you’ve not run a mile!

        Anyway, it’s the start of the weekend now. I hope you have a good one and I’m also hoping that love gives you a big bite on the bum!

        Amanda x

      • kidrock says:

        I can’t confess to ever have been in love – whether that is a good or bad thing, i’m not entirely sure. Though having said that, love is a totally subjective concept, so there can rarely be a one size fit all approach. I mean for example, how would one even begin to decipher if it’s the genuine thing or just last night’s dinner (by your definition)? Is it possible to be in love with more than one person at the same time or do the rules state otherwise?

        Like I declared earlier, since I have never experienced marriage etc, all of my thoughts/beliefs up to now constitute sheer speculation. I don’t claim to have all the answers but I do have a habit of asking questions – this is simply so I can gain an improved understanding. My train of thought has always been one of logic and it is very difficult to break out of the cycle. Throwing caution to the wind has never been my style (at least not where matters of the heart are concerned).

        I’m 31 and have dated women from a broad spectrum of age (a few even older than you I might add). Some pretty interesting experiences to say the least. The one pattern I did see developing is the simple fact that what women SAY they want and what they ACTUALLY want are two entirely different things. Most men would agree with me that this is extremely frustrating. What I have learnt: if you want a better undestanding of women, observe what their actions rather than what they say.

      • DAN says:

        KIDROCK, bang on the button !

        DAN.

      • Amanda says:

        I’m back – as they say it’s grim up north and the winds wiped out our power for an age, and I’ve had a lot of catching up.

        Anyway, I had to reply as your comment about what women say and what women want is, in some cases, the truth.

        I don’t like running down my own sex, but there are some that have a ‘mask’ that they put on, and not just when they’re with men. It exasperates me.

        I cannot argue against logic, though I still think the heart has a lot to do with it – remember my wealthy man. The heart just wasnt in it. And then blue jeans, who was penniless and had a big nose, made it skip a beat.

        This is just a short reply as I’m off to see a dear friend and then we move back to our old house tomorrow. If I don’t hear from you before Christmas or again, have a lovely time and a happy 2012. Tell me if you have any feelings of a stomach bug appearing – I may be able to diagnose soemthing more exciting!

        Amanda x

      • kidrock says:

        Hi,
        I have been dating a woman since April this year and though she has confessed her love for me recently, i am currently torn as to what should be my next step. I do care for her considerably and think i may even love her. As far as the physical aspect of our relationship is concerned, it is going well – we can barely keep our hands off each other.

        My only concern is that i feel we are at different places in our lives. She has already been married once and separated and now lives with her 2 kids. She has a dynamic career and i don’t really know my role in the grand scheme of things. I have yet to experience the whole marriage/kids thing but it is an avenue i prefer to keep open. However, gauging from what she has told me, i don’t really think she wishes to go down that route again.

        What advice can you give me?

      • Amanda says:

        Hi Kidrock, it’s good to hear from you again, I’ve only got a few mins as I’m running out of power and I’ve a taxi booked which should have been her at 9, so I’ll be back tomorrow. Just quickly though, the main issue seems to be that she has a career and has already had children – she may not want to go through it again, and as Fi said, you can only ask her to be sure. I remember you wanted kids, would you be happy without? Hope you’re having a good weekend though, probably more energetic and exciting than most of us.

      • fi says:

        Kidrock. What about getting more information? Telling her what you’re thinking and see what she says in response? Instead of guessing. And why do you have to make any kind of decision now anyway? Especially without sufficient information. Good luck

      • kidrock says:

        Well, i did have this conversation with her a while ago and she seemed pretty convinced that she wasn’t looking for marriage anytime soon and her career was important. I want to have kids but refuse to do so outside marriage (i come from a conservative background and wish to retain this identity). The reason i bring this up now is because i am 32 and she is 36, so time isn’t exactly on her side. I don’t know, maybe we’re kidding ourselves that this will work out?

      • Amanda says:

        Me again. Sorry I didn’t get back earlier. I’d say Fi has got it right, a serious sit down honest conversation is needed. Maybe is she knows what your dreams are she may be willing to share them with you. If not, my own thoughts are that if I wanted chiildren and to have them in wedlock, then I couldn’t be with someone who wasn’t that interested in marriage and was that little bit older. Which is terribly sad as you think you are in love and from what little I know of you, that must be a novel experience. Are you enjoying it? You always seemed a little cynical about the concept. She must be exceptional. I hope it all works out, things usually do, A x

      • kidrock says:

        I had a feeling you might say that.

        In the back of my mind, i kind of knew that the long term thing was going to be unsustainable – maybe i was just in denial about the whole thing. Even though i care about her deeply, i have realised that beyond emotions it is still imperative that 2 people must want the same things in a relationship for it to work.

        Like you’ve mentioned, maybe i should just concentrate on making the most of the present and enjoying myself instead of stressing over what could be.

      • Amanda says:

        Make sure you have the chat first, just to make sure you haven’t got your wires crossed. It would be a shame to find someone that you really care about and end it over a misunderstanding. Good luck kidrock.

      • kidrock says:

        I did have a chat with her this weekend (a pretty lengthy one at that) and we agreed that a long term thing was just not going to work. I guess the best thing for us to do is remain good friends (which i doubt will happen since i’m an all or nothing type of guy). Oh well, onto pastures new.

  • MissBates says:

    But wait a minute — isn’t “PoppySeed” the divorced one who had a mistress? If so, I wouldn’t really think of him as a man to take care of you. Sorry if I’m confusing him with another suitor!

  • fi says:

    Is it not more accurate to say this is a choice between a man who seems interested v one who doesn’t, rather than being kept v romance?

  • Chris says:

    Ummm, as a guy I have never been what you might call choosy. As in I only chose from those who liked me. I never hankered for the unattainable. I could desire a pneumatic blond with legs up to her armpits but I know I ain’t gonna be on her radar so I don’t end up making a fool of meself chasing the impossible dream. Wonder how that sits with the Plankton view of life. Surely we all find our relationship level and that level is whoever finds us sufficiently desirable. I know there are all those guides and books that say say you can attract whoever you want but deep in our hearts we all know that is just baloney. If you constantly strive to fish beyond your level….well, down that path lies loneliness I guess.

  • Dawn says:

    There are many of us who aren’t gold diggers. Solvency is a must, because I don’t make enough to support someone else, but as long as he can support himself, we’re good.

    I don’t think I could be a gold digger. Material things don’t mean enough to me. And I’m not a good enough actress to pretend I’m attracted when I’m not. So unless he’s a rich masochist who enjoys being reviled… and then I’d have no respect for him.

    I’m not enough of a trophy wife in any event. That type prefers elbow jewellery.

  • This is getting nearly impossible to keep track of here- We need a chart, listing Smidgen, Long Shot, Poppy Seed, Longer Shot, Distant Cousin, Married Man, Unmarried Man, etc.

    I can’t keep track of them all anymore, and I want to attempt to calculate some odds here….

  • Empress says:

    To thine own self be true.
    The wisest of words and a pretty good guide for everything in my book.

  • Lydia says:

    I thought you said once “rich and clever” were the requirements. I am probably relatively rare in having to pay out a divorce settlement to my ex husband and I don’t particularly want to repeat the exercise but I certainly don’t need a rich man. I’ve met and rejected plenty who were very wealthy £20m etc etc If I just don’t find them attractive then it’s not going to work. Of course you might want to try for a bit to see if something can develop with someone you don’t find attractive at first. Sometimes it’s not good to make snap judgments but eventually you’ll know.

    4 in 5 women marry men who are more. That’s a huge heap of gold diggers out there who wish to live off male earnings. We are nowhere near parity in terms of men and women equally being likely to earn more than their partner.

    I prefer parity with me to an impoverished man for all kinds of reasons but because parity with me is pretty tricky I do compromise over that. I often end up paying for dinners because I offer and apparently women hardly ever do and as I am constantly paying for a lot of children too and men think I’ve more spare money than I have I do feel pretty generous to them but I suppose if no woman has offered to pay them for dinner for ages and one does they might seize the chance.

  • EmGee says:

    “Follow Your Heart”, I am not surprised that it is your ‘sensible’ friends who advocate this.

  • june says:

    Certanly dont think you a gold digger plankton. me neither, but to quote one of the others, im happy to keep myself i just dont want to keep anyone else.

    Thats why i gave the last plenty fish guy the goodbye, he obviously wanted to meet again, there were no vibes between us but even if were, i felt a person on benefits.living in rented accommodation was definitely not what i needed. He said o you have a company pension, you dont need a job, i thought well no i dont need one, although extra income would be nice, but you do.

    Trouble is i have to say i am of the opnion that dating websites not way to meet anyone, all men on them seem either, sex obsessed, insolvent no hopers or weird., but as rarely meet anyone eligible and friends know noone, thats all im left with.

    • plumgrape says:

      June,
      If Plenty Fish Guy needed a job, why didn’t you give him one? Perhaps he was hoping that you would! I am sure he could have done something you could find well to serve you.

      • june says:

        Sadly plumgrape i am in no position to give anyone a job! i d like one myself to supplement my pension!

        Perhaps as you say thats whats hes looking for or possibly a women with an income and a home of her own, who knows, well it aint me..i am happy to support myself but i am not prepared to support a man or give him a home, my small flat is ideal for me, and me alone.!

  • Jane says:

    Good on you for giving PS another go in the name of fairness, however, you know as well as I do if you have to convince yourself he’s a good bet, then ….he isn’t. Lovely man he may be, comfortably off and all the rest of it, but if the spark isn’t there….it never will be, sad but true!

  • John, a gentle man. says:

    I’m with Scott on this one, Dear Ms Plankton aka The Multiple Man Spinner, please may we have a list of the men involved, and their status, because it’s all getting very confusing.

  • John, a gentle man. says:

    Did anyone else notice the title of this blog ? “Man to look after YOU” while all the ‘sisters’ have been decrying older men because ‘they will need looking after’. A Freudian slip on P’s behalf perhaps ?

    • EmGee says:

      It’s “Man to Look After You V Follow Your Heart” actually.

      Not “An Older, Decrepit Man to Look After You V Follow Your Heart To a Healthy Young Stud”

  • DAN says:

    BRILLIANT, PLANKTON !

    THIS IS THE HAPPY , WITTY , PLANKTON I LIKE TO SEE !

    DAN.

  • fi says:

    Well kidrock, the only people that would know that would be you two, after a number of conversations.

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You are currently reading Man to Look After You V Follow Your Heart at The Plankton.

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